+254 735 204 519 info@conquestadventures.co.ke
+254 735 204 519 info@conquestadventures.co.ke

Manguo Swamp

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Manguo Swamp is a wetland  on the Nairobi-Naivasha Road, only 40 minutes from Nairobi’s Central Business District. Manguo is a local lingo that translates into a hippo; however the hippos must have fled some decades ago as the surroundings become more urban

Manguo Swamp Birdwatching

Manguo Swamp is a wetland  on the Nairobi-Naivasha Road, only 40 minutes from Nairobi’s Central Business District. Manguo is a local lingo that translates into a hippo; however, the hippos must have fled some decades ago as the surroundings become more urban.  It’s an amazing swamp, a wetland that is seasonal and instrumental in regulating water thus controlling flooding, water flows through the ground to refill the ground. Its freshwater is a magnet for birds and other creatures that would not survive in saltwater. While it offers a laid-back morning enjoying the tranquility and the beauty of an array of birds, the swamp is home to freshwater birds and a localized duck, Maccoa Duck. The beautiful chestnut-colored males and the duller grey females keep to their edge of the swamp. Maccoa ducks have in recent times been listed as ‘near threatened’ on the I.U.C.N red list. These are the only African stiff tail ducks. They rarely leave the water because their legs are set far back making waddling on land uncomfortable. Rare Palearctic migrants ducks such as Gadwall and Ferruginous have been also recorded in Manguo

Grey-crowned cranes were once so common in African wetlands. It’s listed by the I.U.C.N as Critically endangered. Studies show that in the last two decades in Kenya and Uganda, Grey-crowned crane populations have spiraled down by 80 percent with an alarming decline of nests due to human-wildlife conflict around nesting sites.

The cranes are spending more time looking out at humans and livestock rather than looking after their eggs and chicks. This translates to high mortality rates of the chicks. And they do not nest at Manguo because there are too many people and livestock around including boda-bodas being washed and all the slimy oil entering the water.